Such a pretty day, and it is COLD.  I have been cold all day.  We went into town, and when I got home I was still cold.  Rather idiotic, as I don’t have a reason to be cold.  I have good clothing, a good warm coat.  Boots.  Gloves and hat.  Nice fire in the stove in the living room around the corner.  However as I sit here typing, I have feet and hands like ice.  Crab and moan day obviously.  Oh well.  I thought I would share a few photos of the interesting and oh so personable animals who live here.

The extraordinary Tweety

The extraordinary Tweety

Tweety joined our family as a last ditch effort by a friend to save her quite literally from the stew pot.  They were positive she was a rooster.  I said yes she could stay.  That next spring, Tweety was  helping nearby while I was standing doing something.  Her normal manner if she thinks I should do something for her has always been to come up, bock at me and peck my foot.  So she was making a LOT of noise, pecked my foot and I looked down to see her stand up and walk away from a beautiful light brown egg !  Nope, not a rooster there !  She is a family favorite and is always very helpful around the place.  The thing I love about chickens, aside from their charming personalities and funny manorisms,  is that we have zero bugs.  Not any mosquitos usually, very few flies.  With West Nile Virus in the county, it is a worry, but they do such a wonderful job at “bug patrol”  I don’t really think about it too much. 

Rita the Aracauna

Rita the Aracauna

Rita was one of our first chickens.  She joined Red, the New Hampshire red hen and Chicky baby, the Rhode Island Red hen.  They were our wonderful source of eggs for many years.  However, there are times when chickens first begin to lay eggs that a very alarming thing can happen – and it did happen to Rita.  One morningI heard her bocking weakly, and she was laid out on the floor of the coop.  She had lost the use of her legs !!!  It was a terrible thing, she was confused and kept pushing, so I knew an egg was “in the chute” so to speak.  Maiden chickens have this occur at times, the egg puts pressure on the nerves that control the legs – and cuts off the signal from the brain to the legs.  It can be fixed by removing the egg carefully.   We rushed her off to the vet, and when the tech took her to take an x-ray, I took a  bathroom break.  The vet came back out with Rita while I was gone and just handed her to mom to hold.  Mom asked if he could “save” the egg 🙂  We laughed about that, and he kept Rita there to extract the egg.  When I went to pick her up that evening, the tech gave her to me, and said “oh, don’t forget this !”  It was a beautiful sky blue egg.  When we got home, we drove in and mom came outside, I happily held Rita, and reached behind the seat and brought up the egg , rather triumphantly I might say……..it was just another odd and fun day in our lives.  Rita was the last of our old chicky ladies, and she passed away a few months ago at the age of 10 or so.  She was a jewel and I find I still call for her when I feed on occasion.

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